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How Blockchain Technology Can Be Used In Cyber Security Strategy?

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How Artificial Intelligence Is Revolutionizing Cybersecurity

Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Cognitive Computing (CC) have opened a new era of cybersecurity.The following are a few examples of how AI can be used to improve and enhance cybersecurity: –

  1. Defending against ransomware – With the introduction of RaaS (Ransomware as a Service), criminals no longer need technical competence to launch an attack. AI-based cybersecurity technologies can regulate attack surfaces and identify/mitigate supported forms of cyber attacks in a large company.
  2. Optimizing cybersecurity in S-SDLC with AI enhancement – If your organization develops software, whether it’s desktop software, mobile apps, online apps, or programs that run on IoT (Internet of Things) devices, you should include cybersecurity in your development process. Occasionally, the development agency lacks the resources to do extensive security testing. This is where AI-powered testing services come in useful. These code testing solutions can perform in-depth code analysis as well as advanced penetration testing.
  3. DGA-Generated domains detection using deep learning algorithms – Domain Generation Algorithms (DGAs) are computer programs that produce pseudo-random domain names (for example – sdlkfusdlfl.com). Malware that calls home (attempts to connect to an external network for command and control) uses pseudo-randomly generated domain names to remain anonymous. DGA algorithms can produce hundreds of thousands of domain names. Trying to ban them all is a pointless exercise because one will get through and connect eventually. In this scenario, AI-based deep learning is being utilized to detect rogue domains generated by a DGA. After viewing enough of these pseudo-random domains, the system is trained to detect them.
  4. Detection, prevention, and remediation of non-malware threats – CryptXXX, CTBLocker, and PowerWare. Web browsers, Microsoft Office applications, and operating system utilities such as PowerShell and Windows Management Instrumentation are frequently used in non-malware attacks. The majority of non-malware threats are recognized by observing computer activity after the incident. Working with a cybersecurity analyst to educate AI-based solutions as well as using neural networks and machine learning algorithms to observe typical behavior, will aid in the creation of improved detection methods.
  5. Stealth, adaptive, and evolutionary Honeypots and Honeytokens – Hackers are attracted to honeypots and honeytokens. Computers, passwords, and other fictitious information are set up on a network to start the process of gathering information about the attack and, eventually, the attacker. The advanced versions of adaptive honeypots and honeytokensare empowered with AI based systems that adapts its behavior in response to the assault, tempting the attacker into revealing as much information as possible. The adaptive honeypot responds by initiating protection in the same way as a protected computer would. When confronted with a new problem, the analyst can learn a lot about the attacker’s skill level and tools by seeing how they respond. As a result, an AI solution can learn and recognize the behavior in the future.

Machine learning and AI can definitely be used to keep updated with the attackers’ tactics in today’s constantly evolving cyber-attacks and proliferation era. Automating threat detection and response are now more effective with use of AI based cybersecurity tools.

Centex Technologies provide enterprise cybersecurity and network security solutions. To know more, contact Centex Technologies at Killeen (254) 213-4740, Dallas (972) 375-9654, Atlanta (404) 994-5074, and Austin (512) 956-5454.

All You Need To Know About Enemybot DDOS Botnet

Enemybot is a new botnet that is conducting DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service) assaults on several routers and websites. It is attacking various routers and websites by leveraging existing vulnerabilities in ARM, BSD, x64, x86, and other architectures. Enemybot was identified by FortiGuard labs in mid-March.

This botnet is mostly based on the source code of Gafgyt, however it has been reported to borrow various modules from Mirai’s original source code. To avoid detection, the Enemybot employs a number of obfuscation techniques and hides Command and control (C2) server on the TOR network. The Enemybot botnet spreads and assaults other IoT devices through a variety of tactics. It attempts to gain access to systems using weak or default credentials by logging into devices with a list of hardcoded username/password combinations. By running shell commands, the bot also attempts to infect misconfigured Android devices that expose the Android Debug Bridge port (5555). Enemybot has been observed infecting Seowon Intech and D-Link routers as well as abusing a previously disclosed iRZ router vulnerability.

The bot leverages a number of known and previously disclosed loopholes, which include: –

  • SEOWON INTECH SLC-130 and SLR-120S routers are vulnerable to CVE-2020-17456.
  • Earlier D-Link routers were vulnerable to CVE-2018-10823.
  • CVE-2022-27226 affects iRZ mobile routers.
  • CVE-2022-25075 to 25084 affects TOTOLINK routers, which were formerly used by the Beastmode botnet.
  • CVE-2021-41773/CVE-2021-42013 is a vulnerability that affects Apache HTTP servers.
  • CVE-2018-20062: This vulnerability affects the ThinkPHP CMS.
  • CVE-2017-18368 is a vulnerability that affects Zyxel P660HN routers.
  • CVE-2016-6277 is a vulnerability that affects NETGEAR routers.
  • CVE-2015-2051 is a vulnerability that affects D-Link routers.
  • CVE-2014-9118 is a vulnerability that affects Zhone routers.

Once one of the foregoing problems has been exploited, the bot will use the shell command LDSERVER to download a shell script from a URL that the C2 server will dynamically update. The script then downloads the real Enemybot binary, which is adapted to the target device’s architecture. If the download server goes down, the botnet managers can update the bot clients with a new URL. The bot connects to its C2 server after being placed on a device and waits for new orders.

Enemybot’s Capabilities

Enemybot connects to the C2 server and waits for orders to be executed when a device is infected. Although the majority of the instructions are connected to DDoS assaults, the virus is not just focused on them. Fortinet presents the following set of supported commands: –

  1. ADNS: Perform a DNS amplification attack with ADNS.
  2. ARK: Stealth survival while launching an attack on the game’s servers.
  3. BLACKNURSE — Flood the target with ICMP packets indicating that the destination port is unreachable.
  4. DNS – Inundate DNS servers with DNS UDP requests that have been hardcoded.
  5. HOLD – Flood the target with TCP connections and keep them alive for a certain amount of time.
  6. HTTP — Send a flood of HTTP requests to the destination.
  7. JUNK — Flood the destination with non-zero-byte UDP packets at random intervals.
  8. OVH – Send custom UDP packets to OVH servers.
  9. STD — Send a flood of random-byte UDP packets to the destination.
  10. TCP — Send a flood of TCP packets to the target with forged source headers.
  11. TLS — Carry out an SSL/TLS attack.
  12. UDP — Send UDP packets with forged source headers to the destination.
  13. OVERTCP — Use randomized packet delivery intervals to launch a TCP assault.
  14. STOP — Put an end to continuous DoS assaults.
  15. LDSERVER – Update the exploit payload download server.
  16. SCANNER — SSH/Telnet brute-force attacks and vulnerabilities spread to additional devices.
  17. TCPOFF/TCPON — Turn the sniffer off or on at ports 80, 21, 25, 666, 1337, and 8080, potentially to gather credentials.

Preventing Botnet Attacks

Always apply the latest available software and firmware updates for your product to prevent Enemybot or any other botnet from infecting your devices and recruiting them to malicious DDoS botnets.

One of the most common signs that your router may be infected with a botnet malware infection is that the router may become non-responsive, internet speeds drop, and the router becomes hotter than usual. In such a scenario, you should restart the router and change the passwords. It is also advised to take services of specialized cyber-security professionals to find and weed out the problem.

Centex Technologies provide state-of-the-art cybersecurity and network security solutions for businesses. To know more, contact Centex Technologies at Killeen (254) 213-4740, Dallas (972) 375-9654, Atlanta (404) 994-5074, and Austin (512) 956-5454.

Public WiFi Security Challenges And How To Prevent The Damage Arising From It

Free Wi-Fi access sites found at restaurants, airports, cafes, hotels, bookstores, and even odd retail outlets are usually frequented by people to use their devices or to connect with internet. However, this liberty comes with a cost, and few people are aware of the dangers of using public WiFi. Learning how to defend against the risks that come with utilizing such sites can go a long way toward keeping data on devices safe and secure.

Security Challenges of using a Public WiFi

The lack of authentication required to establish a network connection makes free WiFi hotspots desirable to users and particularly enticing to hackers. This gives the hackers a fantastic opportunity to acquire full access to unsecured devices on the same network. Instead of communicating directly with the hotspot, you may end up providing your information to the hacker, who may then pass it on.

While working in a free Wi-Fi arrangement, the hacker may have access to every piece of information you send out on the Internet. While using free Wi-Fi, sensitive information such as emails, credit cards, and even security passwords might be exposed. An unencrypted WiFi connection can also be used by hackers to propagate malware. A hacker can swiftly infect a machine with contaminated software if users share data across a network.

Some of the infamous security challenges users face using a Public WiFi: –

  • Compromised Personal Information such as Login credentials, Financial information, Personal data, Pictures, etc.
  • Advanced cyber-attacks on individuals’ devices, businesses, automobiles, smart gadgets, etc.
  • MitM (Man-In-The-Middle) attacks to breach the privacy of communication.
  • Network connections using weak or no secure encryption mechanisms.
  • Sniffing and intercepting the network packets i.e. the communication channels breaching confidentiality.
  • Distributing and injecting malware into devices and network systems.
  • Hijacking the devices and networks using Public WiFi to connect to the internet.

How to prevent or reduce the damage arising from using Public WiFi

A. Transport-level SSL Security

Even if users do not have access to a VPN application for daily Internet browsing, they can still secure their communications. For those websites, being visited regularly or that need one to input credentials, “Always Use HTTPS” option should be selected. Hackers are aware of how people reuse passwords and thus a user’s login and password for some random forum might be the same as the bank or workplace network, which they may exploit.

B. Keep the Public Sharing option Off

Users are advised not to disclose anything when using the Internet in a public area. They can deactivate sharing on WiFi using the system settings the first time they join an unprotected network.

C. Connecting to the Internet using VPNs

When connecting to a business network through an insecure network, such as a WiFi hotspot, a VPN (Virtual Private Network) connection is essential. Even if a hacker manages to get in the middle of the encrypted connection, the data is heavily secured. Because most hackers are looking for a quick buck, they are more likely to throw away encrypted stolen data rather than decode it.

D. Turn Off the WiFi when not in need

Even if users are not connected to a network, WiFi technology still communicates between any networks within their range. There are security mechanisms in place to keep this tiny communication from compromising the users’ devices. It is strongly advised to keep the WiFi turned off if users are only working on a Word or Excel document or any offline application on their devices.

E. Follow the security guidelines provided by the Security Vendors

Even those who take all feasible measures when using public WiFi can occasionally encounter problems. Hence, it is critical to have a good Internet security program installed on the devices. These programs can scan files for malware regularly. They can also scan new files as and when they are downloaded. The best consumer security software often includes business protection features, allowing users to safeguard themselves while simultaneously protecting their servers at work.

There will come a point in every business traveler’s life when the only connection available is an insecure, free public WiFi hotspot. Being equipped with the right security solutions will help the user avoid being a victim of a cybercrime.

Centex Technologies provide state-of-the-art cybersecurity and internet security solutions to businesses. To know more, contact Centex Technologies at Killeen (254) 213-4740, Dallas (972) 375-9654, Atlanta (404) 994-5074, and Austin (512) 956-5454.

Top 5 Infamous Social Engineering Attack Techniques A Business Should Be Aware Of

What is it that makes Social Engineering harmful to your organization?

Social engineering can be defined as any activity persuading a person or a group of people to do or act on something that isn’t always in their best interests. Criminals using social engineering attacks always attempt to exploit human nature for their vested interests. Unlike the usual black hat hackers who breach systems using technology, these attackers strive to affect victim’s judgement through their verbal and written communication skills.

Social engineering attack techniques that are detrimental to businesses

Cybercriminals utilizing social engineering have a range of approaches, just as they do with other types of cyber assaults. The most infamous and most harmful social engineering attacks having the potential to cripple your businesses are listed here: –

Emails with ransomware or scareware embedded in it – Many top executives and leaders of businesses receive emails containing 3rd-party vendor compliance documents with urgency to download the files. As soon as the files get downloaded, certain malicious scripts get executed in the background without your notice. Now, it doesn’t matter whether you fill and upload the document and send it across to the attacker’s duped email. The attacker has already gained access to your computer by the malicious document sent in your email. Scareware social engineering attacks are aimed to terrify you into complying by bombarding you with false alarms, made-up threats, and “urgent” cautions. Typically, these bogus warnings instruct the victim to download and install specific software in order to eliminate the threat.

Pretexting to gather more information – Attackers impersonate law enforcement agencies, government officials, and likewise, which are otherwise trustworthy entities. They do this to deceive their potential victims into providing their personal information like unique identification numbers, user credentials, bank account details, and likewise. Pretexting can also be used to collect non-harmful information yet PII data, such as your mobile phone number or postal address.

Phishing and its various types – Phishing attacks via emails persuade consumers to click on a malicious link or file in an email. Even the most unskilled cybercriminals can easily locate and acquire phishing kits. These are collections of harmful software used to carry out these sorts of assaults attacks. The attacker intends to send emails to a large number of people in the hopes that some of them will get through spam filters and technological safeguards. A tiny fraction of recipients may fall for the trap if the emails are delivered.

In one example, attackers posing as Microsoft employees sent out emails requesting personal information to “re-authorize” some old Office software. Even down to the business insignia, the request appeared quite plausible.

Attackers can pose as IT department officials and request that you confirm your login by clicking on a link that takes you to a fake “official” page. The website, however, takes your credentials as you arrive. Phishing using phone calls is known as ‘Vishing’, while text message scams are known as ‘Smishing’.

Physical social engineering or Tailgating – The fraudster in this case follows authorized people directly into a protected location, avoiding security precautions like swiping an identity card. This is particularly frequent in organizations that need keycard permission.

Watering hole – The cybercriminal conducts research about the firm or industry they are targeting and uses this knowledge to locate websites they visit, such as discussion boards or forums. This is where the name originates from, attackers locate and prey on the target’s “watering hole.” The attacker then identifies and exploits vulnerabilities in the website in order to inject malware. After then, merely visiting the compromised website would infect visitors with malicious code, potentially granting the attacker access to the victim’s account. Users may not be aware they have been hacked.

Centex Technologies provide state-of-the-art cyber-security solutions for businesses. For more information, contact Centex Technologies at Killeen (254) 213-4740, Dallas (972) 375-9654, Atlanta (404) 994-5074, and Austin (512) 956-5454

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