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How To Tell If Your Device Is Affected By Cryptojacking?

As a form of cybercrime, “cryptojacking” includes the illegal use of victims’ equipment (personal computers, mobile phones, tablets, and even servers) to “mine” for bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies. A victim’s computer may be infected with cryptojacking software via phishing, code download from fraudulent websites, or other malicious techniques. Cryptojacking can also occur via code embedded in digital advertizements or web pages that are only activated when the victim visits a particular website.

Why should you be worried about hackers cryptojacking your devices?

A sluggish computer and a larger electricity bill are classic indicators of cryptojacking attacks on a personal laptop used at home. Targeted crypto mining on a massive scale might cause severe damage to a business. System failures and downtime impair sales and corporate productivity and transform expensive, high-performance servers into costly, low-performance servers. As computational resources are diverted from their intended use to suit the needs of cryptocurrency miners, operational costs inevitably increase. Furthermore, the presence of cryptocurrency mining software on the network is indicative of more serious cybersecurity concern.

How to tell if your devices have been Cryptojacked?

The objective of cryptojacking is to mine more cryptocurrency while going undetected for as long as possible. Cryptojacking malware is made to utilize as much power as it requires while remaining undetected. There are several indicators that cryptojacking malware has been installed on your computer. Some of these are:

  • Slower working of devices

The efficiency of computing devices is lowered by cryptojacking. Be wary of gadgets that operate slowly, crash, or have particularly poor performance. You should also pay attention to decreased system performance. Batteries that deplete more quickly than they normally would are another sign.

  • Increase in heat dissipation by the processor and CPU fan

If your computer gets too hot, which might be the result of a cryptojacking website or software, the fan will speed up to cool things down. A cryptojacking script may be present on a website or computer if the user notices that their device is overheating and the CPU fan is constantly operating at a greater speed.

  • Heavy utilization of CPU or computational resources

If your CPU usage goes up when you visit a site with few or no media files, this could be a sign that cryptojacking scripts are running. You can test for cryptojacking by keeping an eye on how much the CPU is being used. You can use the Activity Monitor or Task Manager to check this.

  • Quicker battery discharge

Due to an increase in CPU utilization and fan speed, the power consumption of devices and computing systems increases dramatically. This causes the battery to deplete faster. Therefore, if you observe that the device’s battery is draining quickly, this could be a symptom of cryptojacking

  • Increased electricity costs due to cryptojacking

An increase in power consumption by the infected devices leads to higher electricity usage. An unexpected spike in electric power consumption can also be a possible indicator of devices being infected by cryptojacking malware

Centex Technologies provide cybersecurity and network security solutions to businesses. For more information, you can contact Centex Technologies at Killeen (254) 213 – 4740, Dallas (972) 375 – 9654, Atlanta (404) 994 – 5074, and Austin (512) 956 – 5454.

How Attack Surface Management Works?

PDF Version: How-Attack-Surface-Management-Works

Mobile Security Threats

Most consumers believe that cyber risks only affect laptops or desktop computers. Mobile phones, in fact, have become the new focus of cyber assaults. The ever-increasing number of mobile phone users is a primary driver of this transition. Additionally, the enhanced capability of mobile phones has contributed to this transition.

The majority of mobile phone users nowadays use these devices to conduct most operations, such as making online payments, checking emails, storing personal data, connecting to their organizational network, and so on. As a result, mobile devices serve as a pool of opportunities for cybercriminals.

Another key factor that makes mobile phone users extremely vulnerable is a lack of knowledge about potential cyber security threats. The first step in addressing these threats is to get completely educated on the potential hazards.

Here is a list of some of the mobile security threats:

  • Malicious Apps: Hackers frequently employ fake mobile apps with concealed malware and viruses. These programs are made to look like legitimate applications like games, instant messaging apps, or even antivirus software. The interface, including the layout, theme colors, fonts, and so on, is made to look like authentic apps in order to deceive mobile phone users into downloading false hacked apps. These apps, once downloaded and installed on a mobile device, can perform a variety of actions such as reconfiguring device settings, installing mobile ransomware, sending unauthorized communications, making social media posts, hacking user accounts, copying and sending personal photos to a third-party server, and so on.
  • Mobile Greyware: This type of cyber-attack is less severe than a mobile virus, but it is more widespread. Mobile greyware refers to apps that do not include identifiable malware but can nevertheless harm the mobile device. These programs may be configured to control actions such as tracking the user’s location, monitoring web browsing history, boosting cell costs through unlawful internet access, and so on. ‘Madware’ or ‘Mobile Adware’ is a common type of mobile greyware. It may include apps that display unwelcome adverts in the notification area, substitute the call tone with a speech commercial, or disclose mobile data such as the contact list.
  • Smishing: Smishing is a common term used for SMS phishing. It is a type of tactic used by hackers to target users via text messages. It is a preferred practice as it allows geographic targeting of victims. The fraudsters may pose as a local bank or credit union and send messages to locally present mobile users. The messages may include compromised links for stealing user information.
  • Fake Networks: Similar to laptops or desktops, it is never a good idea to access an open Wi-Fi over a mobile device. Hackers can exploit these networks to intercept information such as emails, messages, login credentials, etc.

Centex Technologies provide complete IT security solutions for businesses. For more information, call Centex Technologies at (254) 213 – 4740.

Stages of Malware Lifecycle

PDF Version: Stages-of-Malware-Lifecycle

Honeypots For Cyber Security Intelligence

The honeypot acts as a decoy, diverting hackers’ attention away from the real target. It may also be used as a reconnaissance tool, with the adversary’s methodologies, capabilities, and sophistication assessed through intrusion efforts. Any digital asset, such as software programs, servers, or the network itself, can be used to create a honeypot. It is carefully constructed to resemble a valid target, with structure, components, and content that are similar to the actual target.

Honeypot intelligence is important in assisting businesses in evolving and improving their cybersecurity strategy in response to real-world threats. It also helps in identifying possible weak spots in existing architecture, information, and network security. A honeynet is a collection of honeypots that are designed to appear as though they are part of a genuine network, replete with various systems, databases, servers, routers, and other digital assets. The cybersecurity team can track all the malicious traffic inside this isolated network while preventing the movement of the attacker outside.

Examples of Honeypots deployed in IT infrastructure

  • False/apparent looking database: In this type of honeypot, a decoy database is created with a motive to mislead the cyber attackers. These databases include dummy information that resembles the actual database, however sensitive business information is missing from the decoy database. The honeypot database has some system vulnerabilities and weak system design, SQL injections, etc. These vulnerabilities pose as a soft target & attract the hackers.
  • Spam honeypot: Spam honeypots work by accepting all the emails without filtering out the spam mails & other proxies. The program opens the mails to reveal their IP address of the spammers so that it can be blocked by the IT team for protecting the network systems.
  • Fake email address: In this case, a fake email address is created which is not visible to legitimate users. The email address can only be reached by automated address harvesters. Thus, the cyber security team is not required to analyze every email and can rest assured that all the emails received on this address are spams and sent by cyber attackers.
  • Spider honeypot: The motive of spider honeypot is to identify spiders – automated web crawlers. A net of web pages and links is created which is concealed from legitimate search engine web crawlers. Only automated and malicious web crawlers can access them. This helps in identifying how bot crawlers work to develop a way to block them.
  • Dummy malicious software: A dummy software or an application programming interface (API) is created to attract the malware attacks. This helps in studying the vulnerabilities that are exploited and the techniques used by the attacker. The information is then used by the cyber security team to develop an effective anti-malware system.


Classifying Honeypots by their Complexity of interaction with hackers

  • Low-interaction honeypots: This type of honeypots is not designed to behave like production systems but can be scaled, if needed. Although they fail to hold the attention of cyber attackers for long but are useful in causing a distraction for some time.
  • High-interaction honeypots: These honeypots are more sophisticated and pose as actual network target. They have the capability to engage the cyber attackers for a longer period and are used to study the malware attacks to improve cyber security practices.
  • Pure honeypots: Pure honeypots are full-fledged network systems and are designed with mock information, user data, etc.

Advantages of deploying Honeypots

  • Recognizing threat actors: Since honeypot systems are only accessible to malicious actors, it makes it easier for the cyber security teams to identify and block them.
  • Break down attacker chain: While the attackers might be crawling through your organization’s network, honeypots can be used to stop these crawlers and trap them from moving further.
  • Adaptation and evolution of ML-AI algorithms: Honeypots assist in studying the mode of action of cyber-attacks and help in adapting ML-AI algorithms to protect against modern attacks.
  • Insider & Outsider threat detection: Honeypots are unique systems that not only help in recognizing malicious actors but also insider attackers.

Risks

  • Hackers might detect a decoy and try to deceive with fake intrusion attempts in order to divert the attention of SOC Analysts away from actual attacks on legitimate system targets.
  • False information is conveyed to the honeypot by hackers to enable them to conceal their identities and confuse the detection algorithms and analytical models.

Honeypots are just one part of a larger cybersecurity posture. When used alone, the honeypot will not be able to safeguard the company from a wide range of dangers and vulnerabilities.

Centex Technologies provides cyber security solutions to businesses. To know more, contact Centex Technologies at Killeen (254) 213 – 4740.

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