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Application Security Tips

With ever-growing challenges of cyber security risks, business applications are exposed to numerous attack vectors on a continuous basis. Being exposed to a vulnerability may disrupt confidentiality, integrity and availability of an application and its digital content. This emphasizes on the importance of application security.

Here are top tips about application security:

  • Assume That Infrastructure Is Insecure: As most cloud providers are opaque in terms of security practices, so it is advisable for application developers to implement enough security measures in the application to suffice its security requirements, without relying on the environment. Also, at the time of development, it is often unknown where the application will be deployed or what environment will the application operate in, so it is safe to assume that the environment will be insecure and rely on in built safety features of the application.
  • Secure Each Application Component: It is important to analyze every component of the application to determine the security measures it would require. Some application components such as program execution resources may require intrusion detection & prevention systems, while others such as database or storage may require access controls to prevent unauthorized elements from accessing the data. In addition to securing each application component, the firewall access should be constricted once the application moves to final production so that only appropriate traffic sources can access application resources.
  • Automate Installation & Configuration Of Security Components: Manual installation & configuration processes are susceptible to human error and may be bypassed in case of urgency and business pressure. Automated installation & configuration of security components ensures that the recommended measures are implemented consistently.
  • Test The Security Measures: Do not overlook inspection and validation of implemented security measures. Make it a point to include penetration testing in security testing protocols to gain valuable feedback on security issues that need to be addressed. Organizations may seek assistance from external parties to have an impartial evaluation of the application security and identify security gaps that may not be spotted in internal environment.
  • Focus On Security Monitoring: Configure the security settings to generate critical alerts. It is important to attain correct configuration so that important alerts are not hidden in a blizzard of unimportant data. This requires continuous assessment & configuration updates and use of tools to send detected anomalies to target staff for timely action.

For more information on Application Security, contact Centex Technologies at Killeen (254) 213 – 4740, Dallas (972) 375 – 9654, Atlanta (404) 994 – 5074, and Austin (512) 956 – 5454.

Cybersecurity Compliance: What Is It & How To Implement It?

PDF Version: Cybersecurity-Compliance-What-Is-It-and-How-To-Implement-It

How Blockchain Technology Can Be Used In Cyber Security Strategy?

PDF Version: How-Blockchain-Technology-Can-Be-Used-In-Cyber-Security-Strategy

How Artificial Intelligence Is Revolutionizing Cybersecurity

Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Cognitive Computing (CC) have opened a new era of cybersecurity.The following are a few examples of how AI can be used to improve and enhance cybersecurity: –

  1. Defending against ransomware – With the introduction of RaaS (Ransomware as a Service), criminals no longer need technical competence to launch an attack. AI-based cybersecurity technologies can regulate attack surfaces and identify/mitigate supported forms of cyber attacks in a large company.
  2. Optimizing cybersecurity in S-SDLC with AI enhancement – If your organization develops software, whether it’s desktop software, mobile apps, online apps, or programs that run on IoT (Internet of Things) devices, you should include cybersecurity in your development process. Occasionally, the development agency lacks the resources to do extensive security testing. This is where AI-powered testing services come in useful. These code testing solutions can perform in-depth code analysis as well as advanced penetration testing.
  3. DGA-Generated domains detection using deep learning algorithms – Domain Generation Algorithms (DGAs) are computer programs that produce pseudo-random domain names (for example – sdlkfusdlfl.com). Malware that calls home (attempts to connect to an external network for command and control) uses pseudo-randomly generated domain names to remain anonymous. DGA algorithms can produce hundreds of thousands of domain names. Trying to ban them all is a pointless exercise because one will get through and connect eventually. In this scenario, AI-based deep learning is being utilized to detect rogue domains generated by a DGA. After viewing enough of these pseudo-random domains, the system is trained to detect them.
  4. Detection, prevention, and remediation of non-malware threats – CryptXXX, CTBLocker, and PowerWare. Web browsers, Microsoft Office applications, and operating system utilities such as PowerShell and Windows Management Instrumentation are frequently used in non-malware attacks. The majority of non-malware threats are recognized by observing computer activity after the incident. Working with a cybersecurity analyst to educate AI-based solutions as well as using neural networks and machine learning algorithms to observe typical behavior, will aid in the creation of improved detection methods.
  5. Stealth, adaptive, and evolutionary Honeypots and Honeytokens – Hackers are attracted to honeypots and honeytokens. Computers, passwords, and other fictitious information are set up on a network to start the process of gathering information about the attack and, eventually, the attacker. The advanced versions of adaptive honeypots and honeytokensare empowered with AI based systems that adapts its behavior in response to the assault, tempting the attacker into revealing as much information as possible. The adaptive honeypot responds by initiating protection in the same way as a protected computer would. When confronted with a new problem, the analyst can learn a lot about the attacker’s skill level and tools by seeing how they respond. As a result, an AI solution can learn and recognize the behavior in the future.

Machine learning and AI can definitely be used to keep updated with the attackers’ tactics in today’s constantly evolving cyber-attacks and proliferation era. Automating threat detection and response are now more effective with use of AI based cybersecurity tools.

Centex Technologies provide enterprise cybersecurity and network security solutions. To know more, contact Centex Technologies at Killeen (254) 213-4740, Dallas (972) 375-9654, Atlanta (404) 994-5074, and Austin (512) 956-5454.

All You Need To Know About Enemybot DDOS Botnet

Enemybot is a new botnet that is conducting DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service) assaults on several routers and websites. It is attacking various routers and websites by leveraging existing vulnerabilities in ARM, BSD, x64, x86, and other architectures. Enemybot was identified by FortiGuard labs in mid-March.

This botnet is mostly based on the source code of Gafgyt, however it has been reported to borrow various modules from Mirai’s original source code. To avoid detection, the Enemybot employs a number of obfuscation techniques and hides Command and control (C2) server on the TOR network. The Enemybot botnet spreads and assaults other IoT devices through a variety of tactics. It attempts to gain access to systems using weak or default credentials by logging into devices with a list of hardcoded username/password combinations. By running shell commands, the bot also attempts to infect misconfigured Android devices that expose the Android Debug Bridge port (5555). Enemybot has been observed infecting Seowon Intech and D-Link routers as well as abusing a previously disclosed iRZ router vulnerability.

The bot leverages a number of known and previously disclosed loopholes, which include: –

  • SEOWON INTECH SLC-130 and SLR-120S routers are vulnerable to CVE-2020-17456.
  • Earlier D-Link routers were vulnerable to CVE-2018-10823.
  • CVE-2022-27226 affects iRZ mobile routers.
  • CVE-2022-25075 to 25084 affects TOTOLINK routers, which were formerly used by the Beastmode botnet.
  • CVE-2021-41773/CVE-2021-42013 is a vulnerability that affects Apache HTTP servers.
  • CVE-2018-20062: This vulnerability affects the ThinkPHP CMS.
  • CVE-2017-18368 is a vulnerability that affects Zyxel P660HN routers.
  • CVE-2016-6277 is a vulnerability that affects NETGEAR routers.
  • CVE-2015-2051 is a vulnerability that affects D-Link routers.
  • CVE-2014-9118 is a vulnerability that affects Zhone routers.

Once one of the foregoing problems has been exploited, the bot will use the shell command LDSERVER to download a shell script from a URL that the C2 server will dynamically update. The script then downloads the real Enemybot binary, which is adapted to the target device’s architecture. If the download server goes down, the botnet managers can update the bot clients with a new URL. The bot connects to its C2 server after being placed on a device and waits for new orders.

Enemybot’s Capabilities

Enemybot connects to the C2 server and waits for orders to be executed when a device is infected. Although the majority of the instructions are connected to DDoS assaults, the virus is not just focused on them. Fortinet presents the following set of supported commands: –

  1. ADNS: Perform a DNS amplification attack with ADNS.
  2. ARK: Stealth survival while launching an attack on the game’s servers.
  3. BLACKNURSE — Flood the target with ICMP packets indicating that the destination port is unreachable.
  4. DNS – Inundate DNS servers with DNS UDP requests that have been hardcoded.
  5. HOLD – Flood the target with TCP connections and keep them alive for a certain amount of time.
  6. HTTP — Send a flood of HTTP requests to the destination.
  7. JUNK — Flood the destination with non-zero-byte UDP packets at random intervals.
  8. OVH – Send custom UDP packets to OVH servers.
  9. STD — Send a flood of random-byte UDP packets to the destination.
  10. TCP — Send a flood of TCP packets to the target with forged source headers.
  11. TLS — Carry out an SSL/TLS attack.
  12. UDP — Send UDP packets with forged source headers to the destination.
  13. OVERTCP — Use randomized packet delivery intervals to launch a TCP assault.
  14. STOP — Put an end to continuous DoS assaults.
  15. LDSERVER – Update the exploit payload download server.
  16. SCANNER — SSH/Telnet brute-force attacks and vulnerabilities spread to additional devices.
  17. TCPOFF/TCPON — Turn the sniffer off or on at ports 80, 21, 25, 666, 1337, and 8080, potentially to gather credentials.

Preventing Botnet Attacks

Always apply the latest available software and firmware updates for your product to prevent Enemybot or any other botnet from infecting your devices and recruiting them to malicious DDoS botnets.

One of the most common signs that your router may be infected with a botnet malware infection is that the router may become non-responsive, internet speeds drop, and the router becomes hotter than usual. In such a scenario, you should restart the router and change the passwords. It is also advised to take services of specialized cyber-security professionals to find and weed out the problem.

Centex Technologies provide state-of-the-art cybersecurity and network security solutions for businesses. To know more, contact Centex Technologies at Killeen (254) 213-4740, Dallas (972) 375-9654, Atlanta (404) 994-5074, and Austin (512) 956-5454.

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